South Park’s ‘Safe Space’: A Parody On Stepford Students

Do you know what Stepford students are? This article by Brendan O’Neill explains:

“They’re everywhere. On campuses across the land. Sitting stony-eyed in lecture halls or surreptitiously policing beer-fuelled banter in the uni bar. They look like students, dress like students, smell like students. But their student brains have been replaced by brains bereft of critical faculties and programmed to conform. To the untrained eye, they seem like your average book-devouring, ideas-discussing, H&M-adorned youth, but anyone who’s spent more than five minutes in their company will know that these students are far more interested in shutting debate down than opening it up.”

Stepford students demand the ‘right to feel comfortable’. Their eyes “glazed with moral certainty”, they demand ‘safe spaces’ – spaces where no student would feel threatened or unwelcome. They seek safety from words, ideas, Zionists, ‘blurred lines’, Nietzsche etc. This new generation of students believe that self-esteem is more important than everyone else’s liberty to speak up their mind. At some universities, like Brown University, ‘safe spaces’ have been set up so that students can take refuge from ‘scary ideas’.

Now comes the greatest part: the concept of ‘safe spaces’ has been discussed in South Park’s latest episode. It is hilarious!

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2 thoughts on “South Park’s ‘Safe Space’: A Parody On Stepford Students

  1. On the one hand, ensuring that kind of safe environment will keep polarization to a minimum, but on the other, it may stunt the development of new ideas and slow the stimulation of intellectual thought. However I don’t know if it is necessary that students discourse for mental stimulation. Very interesting

    • I think that polarization is a good thing. That ideas should battle with one another, and that students should engage in dialogue. If they hide from ‘disturbing’ ideas or let their emotions speak in rational discussions, they shouldn’t go to universities in the first place.

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